Heritage Chocolates

Our Flavors

Gulqand Chocolate   Paan  Khajur Gur Rocks  Saffron  Aam Papad  Rice Crackle  Saunf Misri    Sugar Free Dark   Plain Dark
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“There is nothing better than a friend unless it is a friend with a chocolate.”

Chocolate is the first luxury. We at ‘Heritage On My Plate’ have wrapped up its deliciousness with our own ‘traditional’ twist. There is nothing better to make your day than a bite of divine chocolate and if that comes in the flavors which have been enjoyed through generations together, then it is the icing on the cake!

We at ‘Heritage On My Plate’ have prepared for you a delectable range of chocolates that have been inspired by India’s rich cultural food heritage.

The heritage ingredient is at its core encased in the best handmade chocolaty goodness. Handcrafted in small batches, these artisan chocolates are created with the heavy emphasis on skill and quality.

 

Heritage & Chocolate: What is the connection?

Chocolate has been enjoyed as a drink for over 3500 years now. The history of chocolate begins with a plant whose scientific name — Theobroma cacao–which means “food of the gods.

In fact, Chocolate itself is a ‘heritage’ product, but in the Indian context, it is fairly contemporary.

 Let us be very clear, we are not a ‘bean’ to ‘bar’ outlet, our inherent concept contemporizing heritage ingredients, and the ‘Chocolate’ provides the perfect couple in modernizing our lost traditional heritage elements.

We at ‘Heritage On My Plate’ bring you a unique and exquisite range of chocolate products made up of such ingredients that have been swiftly vanishing from our urbane lifestyles.

Gulkand (Rose Preserve), Paan(Beetle), Khajoor Gur (Date Palm Jaggery), AamPapad (Dried Mango pulp), Saunf(Fennel), Kesar (Saffron) all these heritage ingredients and many more add a new dimension and flavor and perfectly blends with the chocolate. Depending upon the nature of the heritage ingredient, we use Belgian, Dark, White or Premium chocolates.

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India’s Chocolate Journey

Cocoa

Cocoa Pod setting (Image Credit: Mondelez India)

The British East India Company brought Criollo cocoa beans to present da.y Tamil Nadu and Kerala from the Amboyna Island of Indonesia. Initially, the consumers were mainly Europeans based in India.

Cocoa Harvest

Cocoa Harvesting (Image Credit: Mondelez India)

Post-Independence (1947), the Central Government launched a joint initiative with Cadbury of England to expand cocoa cultivation in India. At first, Criollo beans were cultivated and Forastero cocoa plants were later brought in from West Africa.

Cocoa SunDrying

Cocoa-Sun drying (Image Credit: Mondelez India)

In the early 1970s, global cocoa prices soared and many plantations in Kerala began cultivating the trees. Existing Criollo trees were removed to avoid cross-pollination. But when the prices suddenly dropped, most of the cocoa planters moved to rubber and other crops. As an intercrop, it is presently cultivated in Kerela, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka.